Options   View topic - Maxillary Sinus Infection

Board index  >  Sinus Relief Now  >  Chronic Allergic Sinusitis

Post a reply
Maxillary Sinus Infection

Maxillary Sinus Infection
by kenneth » Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:30 pm

Maxillary Sinus Infection - Symptoms of Severe Sinus Disease

Sinuses are mucous filled cavities in the head which help reduce the weight of the skull, insulate it and resonate the voice. There are four sinus cavities, the sphenoid, the ethmoid, the frontal and the maxillary. Sinus infection is the inflammation of the lining of these cavities due to an infection or allergy. Severe sinus disease can also create life threatening situations. :oops:

Sinus can be Cured by Medication

Certain cases of severe sinus disease may also require surgery. Acute sinusitis can also cause temporary blindness, double vision or blurred vision. It is always better to have compositions with as little corrections in it as possible. This is why we have written this composition on Sinus Cavities with no corrections for the reader to be more interested in reading it.

Normal sinus infection can last from ten days to three weeks. A severe sinus disease can go up to three months. There are several symptoms associated with sinusitis. Some of them are low grade fever, headache, jaw pain, facial tenderness and swelling. Bad breath and bad taste are also common in case of sinusitis. The presentation of an article on Sinus plays an important role in getting the reader interested in reading it. This is the reason for this presentation, which has gotten you interested in reading it!

Sinus Should be Cured as Early as Possible

Allowing the sinus to aggravate can cause unnecessary complications. For example, infected mucous entering the lungs can cause life threatening situations. Severe sinus disease can also cause discharge of blood from the nose which can be life threatening. Hence, a doctor should be consulted at the first sign of sinusitis symptoms.


Chronic sinus infection follows persistent bacterial infection. In fact, some studies state that up to 80% of adults with chronic sinusitis also had allergic rhinitis. Chronic sinusitis is diagnosed when symptoms last for at least three months. You are considered to have recurrent sinusitis if you have repeated bouts of acute sinusitis. Unless a headache is chronic it is usually not serious. Although there are many over the counter headache relief medications, they are not without side effects and should not be taken too often.

Some contrabios can be very effective for sinus infections and treatment of allergy responds to lifestyle changes and medications. Do not forget smoking is very bad for people with sinus problems! Nasal allergies are very common in children, and appear to be getting more common all the time. When you have a cold or allergy attack, your sinuses become inflamed and are unable to drain. This can lead to congestion. Just as a book shouldn't be judged by its cover, we wish you read this entire article on Sinus Infection Symptom before actually making a judgement about Sinus Infection Symptom.

Though they hold symptoms in common with sinusitis and sinus infection, a sinus infection symptom may arise when allergies aren't normally set off and when the cold is out of season. But, to be sure, your cold and allergy symptoms can easily turn into a sinus infection if left untreated. If you do not see any signs of these symptoms, but you have had a cold or allergy problems, you can try taking an over the counter decongestant to see if it brings relief to your symptoms. If it does, you probably were having a sinus headache without the infection. We have tried to place the best definition about Sinus Infection in this article. This has taken a lot of time, but we only wish that the definition we gave suits your needs.

Enjoy Some Hot Tea on a Regular Basis

Filled with flavenoids and antioxidants that can find and kill bacteria, the tea's steam can open up and loosen your sinus passages to prevent problems from occurring. Changes in the weather from cold to hot and then back again can cause headaches.These Headaches can also be activated from stress, lack of sleep, skipping meals, and unhealthy living. There are also home remedies for sinus infection when symptoms of sinus problems appear like a cold and hot compress, jalapeno pepper, ripe grape juice. These can provide effective relief from sinus symptoms, find out more about herbal remedies for sinus infection. Whenever one reads any reading matter likeSinuses, it is vital that the person enjoys reading it. One should grasp the meaning of the matter, only then can it be considered that its reading is complete.

Starts With Waking Up and Feeling Stuffy and Congested

There could be a mild headache and visible swelling around the eyes. Then, the condition worsens and it should be no surprise if you suddenly develop a fever. You also remember that you've been coughing now for 14 days straight without improvement. If you've been experiencing these symptoms, there's a good chance that you actually have sinusitis, a condition characterized by an inflammation of the sinus cavities caused by viruses or bacteria. It is usually inconvenient and may be painful in some cases. But it is treatable and usually not severe. Sinus cavities are the moist and hollow air spaces within the bones of the face around the nose. Located in the area near the eyebrows are the frontal sinuses; the maxillary sinuses are located inside the cheekbones; the ethmoid sinuses are fixed between the eyes; while the sphenoid sinuses found behind the ethmoid sinuses. Sinuses produce mucus, which drains into the nose. If your nose is swollen, this can block the sinuses and cause pain and infection. Under normal conditions, sinuses are filled with air which make facial bones appear to be less dense and much lighter in weight. Without these sinuses, the skull would be so much heavier that you would need both hands to hold your head up all throughout the day.

What causes sinus infection?? Inflammation of the sinuses may be caused by viruses or bacteria, or a combination of both. A person with the common cold has viral sinusitis. Usually, nasal congestion doesn't allow the sinuses to drain properly which cause bacteria to become trapped inside the sinus cavities. When this happens, bacterial sinusitis develops. Allergies can also cause a person to develop sinusitis, also known as allergic rhinitis. Unlike a viral sinusitis or allergic rhinitis which are common, bacterial sinusitis tends to cause more inconvenience such as facial pain, swelling and fever. This condition may require a physician's diagnosis and needs to be treated with an antibiotic to cure the infection and prevent future complications. Frequent sinusitis or infection that lasts for three months or more could become chronic sinusitis. When left untreated, it can cause damage to the sinuses and cheekbones that sometimes requires surgery to repair.

Symptoms of Sinusitis

Some of the signs that a person may have bacterial sinusitis are: a stuffy or runny nose with a daytime cough that lasts for 10 to 14 days without improvement mucus discharge from the nose (this can occur with both viral and bacterial sinusitis but continuous thick discharge is more likely to be from bacterial sinusitis) persistent dull pain or swelling around the eyes tenderness or pain in or around the cheekbones a feeling of pressure in your head a headache when you wake up in the morning or when bending over bad breath, even after brushing your teeth pain in the upper teeth a fever higher than 102 degrees Fahrenheit (39 degrees Celsius) Some people also have dry coughs and find it hard to sleep. Others have upset stomachs or feel nausea. Learning about things is what we are living here for now. So try to get to know as much about everything, including Sinusitis whenever possible.

Preventing Sinusitis

Keep your sinuses clear to avoid developing sinusitis by following these simple steps: Use an oral decongestant or a short course of nasal spray decongestant. Drinking plenty of fluids to keep nasal discharge thin. Avoiding air travel. If you must fly, use a nasal spray decongestant before take-off to prevent blockage of the sinuses allowing mucus to drain. If you have allergies, try to avoid contact with things that trigger attacks. If you cannot, use over-the-counter or prescription antihistamines and/or a prescription nasal spray to control allergy attacks. Allergy testing, followed by appropriate allergy treatments, may also increase your tolerance of allergy-causing substances. Always consult medical professionals for advice. Your doctor can always perform diagnostic tests to find out if you have sinusitis. Once the doctor is sure that you have sinusitis, you can be given a prescription that would help treat the nasal infection. People always think that they know everything about everything; however, it should be known that no one is perfect in everything. There is never a limit to learning; even learning about Sinus.

How to Tell a Cold from a Sinus Infection

And how to prevent a cold from becoming a sinus infection. You are sneezing and hacking, your nose is red, congested and blocked, and you feel awful. You have a slight fever. Is it a common cold? Sure it is, but is it a sinus infection? If it is "just a cold" then it is due to a virus. This is called viral rhinosinusitis. ( rhino refers to the nose being involved). If we do a CT scan, we often find sinus cavity changes - thick mucus - in the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses. The sinus drainage passages may be blocked. Under normal conditions this mucus is drained from the sinuses by the action of cilia. These are the tiny oars that move mucus containing bacteria, dust, pollens, etc out of the sinuses and nose. With a "bad cold", the secretions may not be drained out fast enough or the drainage may be blocked. Therefore, steps to increase cilia movement, and remove blockage are indicated. If the mucus remains in the sinus cavity, then bacteria remain in place and can multiply. The rhinosinusitis is then converted to a sinusitis. Common bacteria that cause sinusitis are Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxcella cattarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumonia. They may be present in the nasopharynx and can be carried into the sinuses by heavy coughing and forceful nose blowing. The harder you blow the nose, the more bacteria are blown into the sinuses and ears. The more force you use to clear a blocked ear, the more bacteria you force into that ear. It is possible to take a CT scan in order to help differentiate a common cold from a sinus infection. But this is considered poor practice because the CT scan does not always give an accurate answer, and the cost is a factor. The findings are not as clear as for a broken bone. ( what if we took an X ray on everyone with a cold! Ugh!) Bacterial sinusitis is fairly clear cut: fever, facial pain, tenderness over the sinus and teeth, redness of the nasal membranes and purulent discharge. There can be cough , sneezing and fever. But common cold symptoms may overlap. The ENT doctor has the advantage of viewing the sinus openings with a telescope (called endoscopy) and can see individual sites of sinus drainage. When the discharge and symptoms are one sided and localized, that indicates sinusitis. You don't want to give antibiotics for a common cold. a. Since it is a virus, antibiotics won't cure the condition b. If you are not giving the right antibiotic and the right dose all you may be doing is developing antibiotic resistant strains. c. You build up unnecessary drug resistance this way d. Excess antibiotics are known to have serious side effects.

The Best Thing to Do,

Is to prevent a cold from becoming a sinus infection. The key steps are: - Bed rest and lots of fluids - No nose blowing or if you must, very gentle and both sides open. - Hot tea, lemon and honey. Drink till the urine turns light. - A decongestant or nasal spray to open the swollen nasal passages after the first day. - Pulsatile irrigation to remove any mucus containing bacteria. - If the drainage is heavy colored, do pulsatile irrigation twice a day - Chicken soup to improve cilia movement - Pulsatile irrigation to improve cilia movement - A relaxed attitude Ignorance is bliss, is it? Isn't it better to learn more than not to know about something like Sinus Cavity. So we have produced this article so that you can learn more about it!

Note: it's the chemicals in green or black tea that helps the cilia. Herbal teas don't count. Teas without caffeine are OK. If you are a person that really gets sick with a cold, and catches cold easily, you may benefit by doing pulsatile irrigation when you need to be in the office when everyone there has a cold. By doing irrigation you remove a product called ICAM -1. This is the portal of entrance for the common cold. If there is no ICAM -1, there is no portal of entrance. What is important too, is not to panic when a cold starts. The more anxiety the less natural resistance. Spend your time and thoughts on drinking the tea and chicken soup, rest, watch TV, listen to music, and usually after the first day, the symptoms will be reduced. The concept of rushing to the pharmacy, popping all kinds of pills, spraying all kinds of nasal sprays in a desperate attempt to feel normal is what can lead to cold complications. Your body has been fighting colds for thousands of years. Give it a chance. A relaxed state the first 24 hours is the very best medicine you can buy and it doesn't have side effects! If you are a parent, the most important thing you can do for a child is to teach very gentle nose blowing. That will prevent much ear and sinus problems. And, as has been taught for generations, the best drug for your child is chicken soup. Tea is fine too and you can use decaffeinated tea. Push the liquids. In today's world, anything you can do to reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics, will help reduce your future need for stronger antibiotics. Writing is something that has to be done when one is in the mood to write. So when we got in the mood to write about Sinus Cure, nothing could stop us from writing! :lol:


Generally if the cold lasts more than a week, a sinus infection has taken place. Most rhinovirus colds last a week, and most gradually improve over the next 7 - 10 days. But, if after a week the symptoms haven't changed, or are worse, then it is probably a bacterial sinus infection that needs treatment. A sinus culture can be of real value, as drug resistant bacteria exist in localized areas. Doctors obtain information about resistant organisms in their areas and can give better treatment. A serious problem about antibiotics for suspected sinus infection is that some reports show little difference in outcome in acute cases between placebo and antibiotic!